Everything You Need to Know About Dupuytren's Contracture

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What is Dupuytren's Contracture?

Dupuytren's contracture is a disease of the hands. Though it usually progresses slowly, taking years to develop, the condition can cause severe hand deformity in one or both hands. Dupuytren’s contracture affects a layer of tissue beneath the skin of your palm. Knots of tissue develop under the skin. They eventually make a thick cord that pulls one or more of your fingers into a bent, curled position.

The fingers cannot be straightened, affecting the use of your hand and making everyday tasks, like putting on gloves or putting your hand in your pocket, difficult. The main fingers that are affected are the ring finger and pinky finger.

Dupuytren's contracture occurs most often in white males with ancestors from areas of northern Europe, such as Scandinavia. It is not seen as much in people under 40 years of age. After 40, it is more common. Those who develop the condition at a young age tend to have a more severe form of it. Men get Dupuytren's five to 15 times more often than women. However, women may not see their doctor for it because they are more likely to have a moderate case.

Here's a look at what you should know about Dupuytren’s contracture:

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