instruments used for breast augmentation

The Pros and Cons of Breast Augmentation

Like many cosmetic procedures, breast augmentation has both supporters and critics alike, both with compelling arguments. Ultimately though, undergoing breast augmentation is a decision that only you can make for yourself. Your best bet is to weigh the pros and cons of the surgery and decide if it fits within your own set of values and goals for your life.

Pros of Breast Augmentation

Most women are pleased with the results of a breast augmentation. In a study published by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, a whopping 98% of respondents said that their surgery had met or exceeded their personal expectations for the procedure. On top of this, 35% of women claimed that their breast augmentation significantly increased their overall happiness. Lots of women seek out the surgery because they feel they lack self-confidence about their body, and these statistics are an indicator that it can really work as a confidence booster.

Breast augmentations are also becoming increasingly faster and safer. Both silicone and saline implants have the FDA seal of approval, and the process takes only a little more than a few hours now. When you choose a board-certified surgeon, your risk of complications is very low.

If you’re worried that you might change your mind about breast augmentation after your surgery, you still have the option of reversing it in the future. Granted, this will require more invasive procedures, but breast reduction or implant removal is still technically an option if you find your new look doesn’t suit you.

Cons of Breast Augmentation

Even though your risk of complications is very low, no surgery is completely risk-free. One of the most common things to go wrong with a breast augmentation is infection at the incision site. This complication can lead to exposure of the implant or, in extreme cases, tissue necrosis—however, this typically only occurs in conjunction with other complications.

Many patients also run the risk of using breast augmentation as an emotional band-aid. Even though most women are happy with their results and notice an improvement in self-confidence, this is still a superficial fix to what is likely a deeper problem. Some women may find that the body image issues they struggled with before the procedure resurface in new ways afterwards.

While some insurance plans may cover breast augmentation in certain cases, usually in the event of a mastectomy, many will not pay for cosmetic procedures. This means that your expenses from the surgery are coming directly out of your pocket. According to statistics from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, the average procedure costs about $3,700. While this is much cheaper than many surgeries, breast augmentation can still pose a significant financial burden to many women.