Whooping Cough Prevention

Whooping cough, or pertussis, is a severe infection caused by the bacteria bordetella pertussis. Whooping cough is a formidable sickness because it spreads easily when another person coughs in your vicinity. Luckily, with prevention techniques, you can avoid this painful infection.

Immunization

Above all else, if you want to prevent this painful and annoying condition, you need to get vaccinated. Fortunately, in first world countries, most young people receive a whooping cough vaccination. While it’s possible for a vaccination to wear off, this is not common. The real problem comes when a person with whooping cough comes into contact with a young baby who hasn’t yet receive the vaccination. Kids under the age of six months often don’t have vaccinations and are at an increased risk of developing the condition. Older people should consider vaccination if they did not receive one in their early years.

Hygiene

If you want to avoid sickness, you need to wash your hands. Always wash your hands after you use the bathroom, come into contact with an infected person, or cough into your hand. When washing your hands, take time to scrub them thoroughly. Use hot water and soap to kill any remnants of harmful bacteria. This will not only help you avoid whooping cough, but also a host of other conditions.

Avoid Contact with Infected People

To avoid the whooping cough, you will want to avoid people who are susceptible or already have the infection. Most people in countries with established health care systems have been vaccinated and pose no risk. However, when heading to a developing country, you should ensure that you are vaccinated and take steps to avoid the infection.

Conclusion

While whooping cough is nearly eradicated, it’s still possible to contract this painful infection. First and foremost, you need to go to your doctor and get vaccinated. However, if you want to protect yourself further, wash your hands frequently and try to avoid coming into contact with other people who may have the infection.

Last Updated: October 24, 2016